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ARC Review: Inherit the Stars

12.08.2015
Inherit the Stars by Tessa Elwood
Published: December 8th, 2015 by Running Press Kids
Source: NetGalley
*I received a copy of this novel in exchange for an honest review. This in no way affected the opinions stated below.
Three royal houses ruling three interplanetary systems are on the brink of collapse, and they must either ally together or tear each other apart in order for their people to survive.

Asa is the youngest daughter of the house of Fane, which has been fighting a devastating food and energy crisis for far too long. She thinks she can save her family’s livelihood by posing as her oldest sister in an arranged marriage with Eagle, the heir to the throne of the house of Westlet. The appearance of her mother, a traitor who defected to the house of Galton, adds fuel to the fire, while Asa also tries to save her sister Wren's life . . . possibly from the hands of their own father.

But as Asa and Eagle forge a genuine bond, will secrets from the past and the urgent needs of their people in the present keep them divided?

 photo addtogoodreadssmall_zpsa2a6cf28.png photo B6096376-6C81-4465-8935-CE890C777EB9-1855-000001A1E900B890_zps5affbed6.jpg

Inherit the Stars tells the story of Asa, the daughter of a man who kind of runs a dying planet. The sister she’s closest to is in a coma. The other sister is about to be married to a stranger from a different planet in a political deal to get food to their own planet. Through a series of events, Asa ends up impersonating her sister and marrying Eagle, betraying the original deal. Inter-planetary conflicts! Sounds awesome, right?

Unfortunately, for me, it was not. The synopsis throws out a whole lot of awesome, but the book itself doesn’t deliver a lot of it. The bit about her mom barely felt significant—it led to a big thing, definitely, but so much more could have been done with it so that it had a bigger impact. That was a big problem for me—nothing had an impact on me. We’re supposed to care about these characters, to feel with them and for them, and I personally didn’t. The emotions just didn’t come across to me as they were written. I've been having that problem a lot lately; I'm probably just not very sympathetic because of my ice cold heart.

12.08.2015

ARC Review: Inherit the Stars

Inherit the Stars by Tessa Elwood
Published: December 8th, 2015 by Running Press Kids
Source: NetGalley
*I received a copy of this novel in exchange for an honest review. This in no way affected the opinions stated below.
Three royal houses ruling three interplanetary systems are on the brink of collapse, and they must either ally together or tear each other apart in order for their people to survive.

Asa is the youngest daughter of the house of Fane, which has been fighting a devastating food and energy crisis for far too long. She thinks she can save her family’s livelihood by posing as her oldest sister in an arranged marriage with Eagle, the heir to the throne of the house of Westlet. The appearance of her mother, a traitor who defected to the house of Galton, adds fuel to the fire, while Asa also tries to save her sister Wren's life . . . possibly from the hands of their own father.

But as Asa and Eagle forge a genuine bond, will secrets from the past and the urgent needs of their people in the present keep them divided?

 photo addtogoodreadssmall_zpsa2a6cf28.png photo B6096376-6C81-4465-8935-CE890C777EB9-1855-000001A1E900B890_zps5affbed6.jpg

Inherit the Stars tells the story of Asa, the daughter of a man who kind of runs a dying planet. The sister she’s closest to is in a coma. The other sister is about to be married to a stranger from a different planet in a political deal to get food to their own planet. Through a series of events, Asa ends up impersonating her sister and marrying Eagle, betraying the original deal. Inter-planetary conflicts! Sounds awesome, right?

Unfortunately, for me, it was not. The synopsis throws out a whole lot of awesome, but the book itself doesn’t deliver a lot of it. The bit about her mom barely felt significant—it led to a big thing, definitely, but so much more could have been done with it so that it had a bigger impact. That was a big problem for me—nothing had an impact on me. We’re supposed to care about these characters, to feel with them and for them, and I personally didn’t. The emotions just didn’t come across to me as they were written. I've been having that problem a lot lately; I'm probably just not very sympathetic because of my ice cold heart.