Review: Ultraviolet

2.10.2012
Ultraviolet by R.J. Anderson
Published June 2nd 2011 by Orchard
//Amazon//B&N//The Book Depository//

Once upon a time there was a girl who was special.

This is not her story.

Unless you count the part where I killed her.

Sixteen-year-old Alison has been sectioned in a mental institute for teens, having murdered the most perfect and popular girl at school. But the case is a mystery: no body has been found, and Alison's condition is proving difficult to diagnose. Alison herself can't explain what happened: one minute she was fighting with Tori -- the next she disintegrated. Into nothing. But that's impossible. Right?
I had such an incredibly hard time writing a review for this. There are so many things I want to say about it, but the words just wouldn't come.

I want to say I was surprised by how amazing this book was, but I really wasn't. I'd read so many amazing things about it and my best friend loved it, too, before she let me borrow it. To say I went in with high expectations is an understatement. To say Ultraviolet met those expectations is an even bigger understatement.

Much of this book takes place in a mental hospital. You'd think that that would get boring after awhile, but no. Not even close. The other characters in the mental hospital make for a great setting for the book. They all had their own little stories which, while not completely necessary to the actual book, kept me interested and provided some variety.

Some may argue that the main character and narrator, Alison, is cold and distant. In a way, she is, but that didn't stop me from loving her. Alison is a very unique character. Her narrative isn't like anything I've ever read before, so she was new and exciting for me. Sure, she's fairly distant from everyone else, but if you were in her situation, you would be the same way. Alison is distraught, wondering how sane she truly is, but she still manages to be strong and curious and smart and relateable. Basically? I love her.

Sebastian Faraday is probably officially one of my favorite love interests. (And not just because he reminds me of the TV show LOST.) He's yet another character that is unlike anyone I've ever read. He's mysterious, but not in the frustrating way. He's the only one who can truly help Alison, and he does things the right way. I love him even more than Alison.

But Ultraviolet isn't just about awesome characters. There's mystery and intrigue, too. You spend the book contemplating - What really happened to Tori Beaugrand?

(Let's pretend I spelled that name right.)

Overall: Ultraviolet is a complex read that really makes you think, but it's one of the most original things I've ever read in my entire life. I don't know what I can tell you to convince you to read it, but Ultraviolet takes sci-fi to a whole new level. And it's not even heavy on the sci-fi. 4.5 stars.

~Zoey~
7 comments on "Review: Ultraviolet"
  1. Great review! i have seen this before in the bookstore, but never decided to check it out, but it sounds really interesting! I like original stories!

    Farah @MajiBookshelf

    ReplyDelete
  2. Le review est tres excellent. >:D And yes, I'm too lazy to go on a translater and get accent marks. Pfff.

    Anyways. This book. I need it.

    ReplyDelete
  3. This is the first review I have read on this book. I have seen it, but didn't know anything about it. Excellent review. I will have to check this book out. :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Okay, now I am certain I am missing out on a good book! I keep seeing so many great reviews for this book. I'm definitely going to have to bump it up a few places on the TBR. :D Nice review, Zoey.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Sam: Yes. Yes you are.

    Lexie: Accents are just too much effort.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Maji: Original is definitely something to describe it :D

    Amy: Yes, you should! :D

    ReplyDelete
  7. I'm a huge sci-fi fan. So that makes this sound right up my ally. If you say it's original, then I definitely want to read it!

    ReplyDelete

2.10.2012

Review: Ultraviolet

Ultraviolet by R.J. Anderson
Published June 2nd 2011 by Orchard
//Amazon//B&N//The Book Depository//

Once upon a time there was a girl who was special.

This is not her story.

Unless you count the part where I killed her.

Sixteen-year-old Alison has been sectioned in a mental institute for teens, having murdered the most perfect and popular girl at school. But the case is a mystery: no body has been found, and Alison's condition is proving difficult to diagnose. Alison herself can't explain what happened: one minute she was fighting with Tori -- the next she disintegrated. Into nothing. But that's impossible. Right?
I had such an incredibly hard time writing a review for this. There are so many things I want to say about it, but the words just wouldn't come.

I want to say I was surprised by how amazing this book was, but I really wasn't. I'd read so many amazing things about it and my best friend loved it, too, before she let me borrow it. To say I went in with high expectations is an understatement. To say Ultraviolet met those expectations is an even bigger understatement.

Much of this book takes place in a mental hospital. You'd think that that would get boring after awhile, but no. Not even close. The other characters in the mental hospital make for a great setting for the book. They all had their own little stories which, while not completely necessary to the actual book, kept me interested and provided some variety.

Some may argue that the main character and narrator, Alison, is cold and distant. In a way, she is, but that didn't stop me from loving her. Alison is a very unique character. Her narrative isn't like anything I've ever read before, so she was new and exciting for me. Sure, she's fairly distant from everyone else, but if you were in her situation, you would be the same way. Alison is distraught, wondering how sane she truly is, but she still manages to be strong and curious and smart and relateable. Basically? I love her.

Sebastian Faraday is probably officially one of my favorite love interests. (And not just because he reminds me of the TV show LOST.) He's yet another character that is unlike anyone I've ever read. He's mysterious, but not in the frustrating way. He's the only one who can truly help Alison, and he does things the right way. I love him even more than Alison.

But Ultraviolet isn't just about awesome characters. There's mystery and intrigue, too. You spend the book contemplating - What really happened to Tori Beaugrand?

(Let's pretend I spelled that name right.)

Overall: Ultraviolet is a complex read that really makes you think, but it's one of the most original things I've ever read in my entire life. I don't know what I can tell you to convince you to read it, but Ultraviolet takes sci-fi to a whole new level. And it's not even heavy on the sci-fi. 4.5 stars.

~Zoey~

7 comments:

  1. Great review! i have seen this before in the bookstore, but never decided to check it out, but it sounds really interesting! I like original stories!

    Farah @MajiBookshelf

    ReplyDelete
  2. Le review est tres excellent. >:D And yes, I'm too lazy to go on a translater and get accent marks. Pfff.

    Anyways. This book. I need it.

    ReplyDelete
  3. This is the first review I have read on this book. I have seen it, but didn't know anything about it. Excellent review. I will have to check this book out. :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Okay, now I am certain I am missing out on a good book! I keep seeing so many great reviews for this book. I'm definitely going to have to bump it up a few places on the TBR. :D Nice review, Zoey.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Sam: Yes. Yes you are.

    Lexie: Accents are just too much effort.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Maji: Original is definitely something to describe it :D

    Amy: Yes, you should! :D

    ReplyDelete
  7. I'm a huge sci-fi fan. So that makes this sound right up my ally. If you say it's original, then I definitely want to read it!

    ReplyDelete