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Review: Anna and the French Kiss

8.09.2011
Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins:
Published December 2nd, 2010 by Dutton
//Amazon//B&N//The Book Depository//

Anna is looking forward to her senior year in Atlanta, where she has a great job, a loyal best friend, and a crush on the verge of becoming more. Which is why she is less than thrilled about being shipped off to boarding school in Paris - until she meets Etienne St. Clair: perfect, Parisian (and English and American, which makes for a swoon-worthy accent), and utterly irresistible. The only problem is that he's taken, and Anna might be, too, if anything comes of her almost-relationship back home.

As winter melts into spring, will a year of romantic near - misses end with the French kiss Anna - and readers - have long awaited?


There's really no point in doing this review, because unless you are insane or broke, you should have already read this book.

And let me just start off by saying that "I only read paranormal" or "I only read fantasy" is not a legit excuse for not reading this book. I've never been a fan of published general fiction for some unknown reason, but I don't think I've met a single person yet who hasn't liked this book.

Of course, it helps that this takes place at a boarding school. In France. I think that ought to get anyone interested.

The book starts off with Anna's parents leaving her at her school in France. Practically abandoning her. I found it kind of funny, because really, whose parents just abandon you on a different continent when your kid knows nothing about her school?

Anyways. The characters. Definitely the best part of this book. Anna's narrative is so easy to read and understand, even easier to connect to. Her emotions seemed real and realistic.

I still can't get used to calling St. Clair Etienne, though. That was a problem of mine -- for more than half the book, Anna calls him St. Clair, but then suddenly it's Etienne every time she's talking to him. It seemed to come out of nowhere.

Anna and St. Clair's relationship was never dull. From the moment Anna met him, she was practically in love. (Not that she knew that. But still.) And St. Clair was always so nice and funny . . . . The only problem was his girlfriend.

Throughout the book, St. Clair takes Anna all around Paris, especially to the theaters, since Anna is a film freak. That's another thing I liked about the book - how realistic Anna was. She had a hobby, she wasn't perfect, she didn't understand any French, her emotions were almost never irrational. And St. Clair was that way, too. Maybe not at first. At first, he seemed perfect, and that irritated me, but then you started to see that he was just as human as Anna, that he had his hobbies too.

The only complaint I have about the book is that there was a lot of unnecessary drama. Okay, obviously St. Clair couldn't dump his girlfriend right in the beginning. What kind of story would that be? But like Michelle said, there were about twenty unnecessary pages at the end, all because of a very stupid and pointless thing that St. Clair did. I felt like Perkins was trying to make everything that could go wrong actually go wrong.

But that's the only thing I didn't like. Which is saying something. And on top of being adorable and realistic, Anna and the French Kiss was funny, too. Anna's got some subtle sarcasm that I absolutely loved. Some quotes of my favorite quotes:


* "French name, English accent, American school. Anna confused."\
* "I mean, really. Who sends their kid to boarding school? It's so Hogwarts. Only mine doesn't have cute boy wizards or magic candy or flying lessons."  
* "Soap?"
"School of America in Paris" he explains. "SOAP".
Nice. My father sent me here to be cleansed.

* "Girl scouts didn't teach me what to do with emotionally unstable drunk boys."  
* "Is it possible for home to be a person and not a place?"

I feel like you'd have to be insane not to like this book.  
 ~Zoey~

8.09.2011

Review: Anna and the French Kiss

Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins:
Published December 2nd, 2010 by Dutton
//Amazon//B&N//The Book Depository//

Anna is looking forward to her senior year in Atlanta, where she has a great job, a loyal best friend, and a crush on the verge of becoming more. Which is why she is less than thrilled about being shipped off to boarding school in Paris - until she meets Etienne St. Clair: perfect, Parisian (and English and American, which makes for a swoon-worthy accent), and utterly irresistible. The only problem is that he's taken, and Anna might be, too, if anything comes of her almost-relationship back home.

As winter melts into spring, will a year of romantic near - misses end with the French kiss Anna - and readers - have long awaited?


There's really no point in doing this review, because unless you are insane or broke, you should have already read this book.

And let me just start off by saying that "I only read paranormal" or "I only read fantasy" is not a legit excuse for not reading this book. I've never been a fan of published general fiction for some unknown reason, but I don't think I've met a single person yet who hasn't liked this book.

Of course, it helps that this takes place at a boarding school. In France. I think that ought to get anyone interested.

The book starts off with Anna's parents leaving her at her school in France. Practically abandoning her. I found it kind of funny, because really, whose parents just abandon you on a different continent when your kid knows nothing about her school?

Anyways. The characters. Definitely the best part of this book. Anna's narrative is so easy to read and understand, even easier to connect to. Her emotions seemed real and realistic.

I still can't get used to calling St. Clair Etienne, though. That was a problem of mine -- for more than half the book, Anna calls him St. Clair, but then suddenly it's Etienne every time she's talking to him. It seemed to come out of nowhere.

Anna and St. Clair's relationship was never dull. From the moment Anna met him, she was practically in love. (Not that she knew that. But still.) And St. Clair was always so nice and funny . . . . The only problem was his girlfriend.

Throughout the book, St. Clair takes Anna all around Paris, especially to the theaters, since Anna is a film freak. That's another thing I liked about the book - how realistic Anna was. She had a hobby, she wasn't perfect, she didn't understand any French, her emotions were almost never irrational. And St. Clair was that way, too. Maybe not at first. At first, he seemed perfect, and that irritated me, but then you started to see that he was just as human as Anna, that he had his hobbies too.

The only complaint I have about the book is that there was a lot of unnecessary drama. Okay, obviously St. Clair couldn't dump his girlfriend right in the beginning. What kind of story would that be? But like Michelle said, there were about twenty unnecessary pages at the end, all because of a very stupid and pointless thing that St. Clair did. I felt like Perkins was trying to make everything that could go wrong actually go wrong.

But that's the only thing I didn't like. Which is saying something. And on top of being adorable and realistic, Anna and the French Kiss was funny, too. Anna's got some subtle sarcasm that I absolutely loved. Some quotes of my favorite quotes:


* "French name, English accent, American school. Anna confused."\
* "I mean, really. Who sends their kid to boarding school? It's so Hogwarts. Only mine doesn't have cute boy wizards or magic candy or flying lessons."  
* "Soap?"
"School of America in Paris" he explains. "SOAP".
Nice. My father sent me here to be cleansed.

* "Girl scouts didn't teach me what to do with emotionally unstable drunk boys."  
* "Is it possible for home to be a person and not a place?"

I feel like you'd have to be insane not to like this book.  
 ~Zoey~